Skip to content

Archive

Tag: Homebrewing

There are many reasons people get into homebrewing. One reason is to learn the art of making beer. Another big reason is that people are looking to make styles of beer they love at a cheaper price. But here’s the catch, ingredients (especially hops) are still kind of expensive.

But what if you can save some money on hops? Well, this Saturday, December 6th from 1PM to 4PM the Anheuser-Busch Home Brewers Group are giving away hops in an event they’re calling the Great Hop Give-Away! This will be your chance to get some free Cascade whole-cone hops for a limited this this Saturday.

All you need to do is show up at the designated time in the Biergarten at the Tour Center and bring your own bag/container. This is a great way to save some money and make some great beer.

Check this PDF for more info.

There are many reasons people get into homebrewing. One reason is to learn the art of making beer. Another big reason is that people are looking to make styles of beer they love at a cheaper price. But here’s the catch, ingredients (especially hops) are still kind of expensive.

But what if you can save some money on hops? Well, this Saturday, December 17th from 1PM to 4PM the Anheuser-Busch Home Brewers Group is giving away hops in an event they’re calling the Great Hop Give-Away! This will be your chance to get some free Hallertau & Saaz whole-cone hops for a limited this this Saturday.

All you need to do is show up at the designated time, bring your own bag/container, and tell the folks at the visitor center that you’re there for the giveaway, they’ll direct you to where you need to go. This is a great way to save some money and make some great beer.

Check this PDF for more info.

stlbrews.gifThis one is for all of those homebrewers out there. If you’re looking to get some honest feedback on your beer, a homebrew competition is the best place to start. They’re going to give you informative feedback that can only help to improve your beer. Dan Stauder of the St. Louis Brews forwarded information on to me about this year’s competition:

The Happy Holiday Homebrew Competition is the St. Louis Brews annual homebrew competition. It is a fully sanctioned AHA and BJCP event. This year it will be held on December 8, December 10, 2010 and December 11, 2010.

The location of the competition & banquet is the Hill Brewing Company. We are proud to be the final qualifying event for the Thirteenth Annual Masters Championship of Amateur Brewing.

2 bottles per entry
Fee is $6.00 per entry
Entries must be received by Friday, December 3, 2010

Please register on the web with a valid email address. The registration page will have all the details of where to send the entries. Local dropoff will be at the local homebrew shops.

I plan on entering a few beers this year just to get some feedback (and if they’re good enough maybe win an award.) If you’re a homebrewer I would strongly suggest that you do the same!

beer-312_1280×960.jpgAh, it’s that time of the year again. Time to break out your mash paddle, fire up the burners and teach someone how to homebrew! According to the American Homebrewers Association, “Teach a Friend to Homebrew Day is an international event to introduce people to the homebrewing hobby and establish relationships with local homebrew supply shops.”

Each year on the first Saturday in November homebrewers get together and gather up some friends and teach them how to brew beer. It could be possible that your friends may not ever brew a beer again, but I think it’s very important that if you love beer, you understand how beer is made.

But what if you don’t know a friend that homebrews? Well, you always have a friend at the St. Louis Wine and Beermaking shop, as they’re hosting a homebrewing demonstration on November 6th running from 9AM-4PM:

All grain demonstrations starting at 9AM-4PM at St. Louis Wine & Beer Making.  Local brew club memebers from St. Louis Brews, Garage Brewers Society and East Side Brewers will be on hand doing demonstrations and answering homebrew questions.

If you’re looking for some used equipment, you’re also in luck as the they’ll also also be running a St. Louis Area Brewers Flea Market at St. Louis Wine and Beermaking from 11AM-12:30PM. Homebrewers from the area will be peddling their wares and you may be able to pick up quite a bargain on some used equipment.

You can also sell your old equipment. For more information about this event, please check out this thread on the St. Louis Brews forum.

Update: Added new beers from East Side Brewers and A-B Homebrewing Club.

Evan Benn at the Post-Dispatch has a rundown of all of the commercial beers available at this year’s St. Louis Brewers Heritage Festival. Edit: Looks like Evan linked to the list of all these beers.  But think of this as me saving you an extra click. But there are a group of homebrewers from the St. Louis Brews and Garage Brewers Society that put together some great beers for you to sample as well.

It’s important to note that all of the beers listed below will be on at random times during the festival.  There is no set schedule for releasing these beers.  Here’s a list of the homebrew and the brewers that brewed it:

American Wheat

  • Bryan Clauser (GBS)
  • Scott Hespen (GBS)
  • Scott Hespen (GBS)
  • Tim Hayes (GBS)
  • Tim Hayes – Peach Wheat (GBS)
  • Jim Yeager – Raspberry Wheat (GBS)
  • Jim Yeager – Centennial Wheat (GBS)
  • Adam Greminger – American Honey Wheat (GBS)
  • Adam Greminger – Dustin Brown’s Wedding Wheat (GBS)
  • Steve Dahl (GBS)
  • Steve Dahl (GBS)
  • Brad Mock (StLBrews)
  • Paul Murphy – Murphy’s American Wheat Ale (StLBrews)
  • Paul Murphy – Nat.’l Homebrew Day Amer. Wheat Ale w/Wyeast 1010 (StLBrews)
  • Paul Murphy – Nat.’l Homebrew Day Amer. Wheat Ale w/Schlafly’s Yeast (StLBrews)
  • Michael McCoy (StLBrews)
  • Andrew Bretz (StLBrews)
  • Kerth Stocker (StLBrews)

Red/Amber

  • Scott Walters – Irish Red (GBS)
  • Scott Walters – Irish Red (GBS)
  • Jeff Britton (GBS)
  • Dave Harnett (GBS)
  • Tim Cochran – American Amber (StLBrews)
  • Nic Zimmer – Irish Red, 4 gal (StLBrews)

APA

  • Ted O’Neil (StLBrews)
  • Dan Stauder (StLBrews)
  • John Mitchell (StLBrews)
  • John Mitchell (StLBrews)
  • Mike Walters (StLBrews)
  • Gary Burke (StLBrews)
  • Gary Burke (StLBrews)
  • Christopher Horn – Rye Pale Ale (StLBrews)
  • Kally Gehly – Rye Pale Ale (StLBrews/GBS)
  • Kally Gehly – Single-Hop Pale Ale w/Sterling (StLBrews/GBS)
  • Kally Gehly – Single-Hop Pale Ale w/Sterling (StLBrews/GBS)
  • Scott Walters (GBS)
  • Kent Critchell (GBS)
  • Jim Leabig (GBS)
  • Shawn Mitchell (GBS)

IPA

  • Bryan Clauser (GBS)
  • Tim Hayes (GBS)
  • Jim Leabig (GBS)
  • Dennis Stroup – “Virgin Nectar” IPA (GBS)
  • Kevin Tierney (StLBrews)
  • Rick Haynes (StLBrews)
  • Rick Haynes (StLBrews)

Stout

  • Bob Brandt (GBS)
  • Doug Howell (GBS)
  • Jim Yeager – Oatmeal Stout (GBS)
  • Phil “O” – Milk Stout (GBS)
  • Jerid Saffell – American Stout, 7.5% ABV, 60 IBUs, Magnum, Ahtanum, & Simcoe hops (GBS)
  • Bridget Doherty – Breakfast Stout (StLBrews)
  • Nic Zimmer – Sweet Stout, 2.5 gal (StLBrews)

German Hefeweizen

  • Rick Haynes (StLBrews)
  • Rick Haynes (StLBrews)
  • David Roesch – Bavarian Hefeweizen/Heritage Festival Beer (StLBrews)
  • David Roesch – Bavarian Hefeweizen/Heritage Festival Beer (StLBrews)
  • Joe Orsa – Bavarian Hefeweizen/Heritage Festival Beer (StLBrews)
  • Sean Sweeney (StLBrews)
  • Gary Reynolds (GBS)
  • Jerid Saffell – 5% ABV, 12 IBU, Magnum hops (GBS)

Fruit

  • Bob Love – Raspberry Cream Ale (GBS)
  • Bob Love – Cherrywood Smoked Wheat (GBS)
  • Dave Blue – Lemon Coriander Wheat (GBS)

ESB

  • Tim Fahrner (StLBrews)
  • Kevin Tierney (StLBrews)
  • Kally Gehly – gal (StLBrews/GBS)
  • John Sutton (GBS)
  • Scott Hespen (GBS)

Blonde Ale

  • Scott Hixson (StLBrews)
  • Kerth Stocker (StLBrews)
  • Christopher Horn (StLBrews)
  • Steven May (StLBrews-affiliated)
  • John Grady (GBS)
  • Jerid Saffell – American Blonde, 4.8% ABV, 25 IBU, Summit & Ahtanun hops (GBS)
  • Jerid Saffell – American Blonde, 4.8% ABV, 25 IBU, Summit & Ahtanun hops (GBS)

Kolsch

  • Tim Hayes (GBS)
  • Kent Robertson – Bonn-Bonn Kolsch (StLBrews)

Porter

  • John Grady (GBS)
  • Jim Yeager – Coconut Vanilla Porter (GBS)
  • Tim Hayes – Chocolate Porter (GBS)

Cider

  • Peter MacKercher (StLBrews)
  • Paul Murphy – Hard Apple Cider (StLBrews)

Scottish Ales

  • Kevin Tierney (StLBrews)
  • Nic Zimmer – 80-Shilling, 4 gal (StLBrews)

Cream Ale

  • Dan Stauder (StLBrews)
  • Dan Stauder (StLBrews)
  • Dan Stauder (StLBrews)
  • Jeff Britton – Cream Ale (GBS)
  • Andrew Wall – Coconut Cream Ale (GBS)

Miscellaneous

  • Michael Doherty – Belgian Quad (StLBrews)
  • Michael Doherty – Belgian Quad (StLBrews)
  • Trish Thomas – Saison w/fruit (StLBrews)
  • Trish Thomas – Belgian Triple (StLBrews)
  • Chris Rahn – American Brown Ale (StLBrews)
  • Jack Baty – Tart Cherry Beer, Aged 9 months (StLBrews)
  • Sean Sweeney – Maibock (StLBrews)
  • Sean Sweeney – Pennsylvania Swankey (a historic American beer w/star anise) (StLBrews)
  • Kally Gehly – “Teddy Grahams” Ale (GBS “Ironman” Comp. Beer; StLBrews)
  • David Nitzche – “Mystery Hops and Malts Ale” (StLBrews)
  • Gary Burke – Maibock (StLBrews)
  • Jerid Saffell – Cerveza-style (GBS)
  • Chris Buchanan – Jalepeno Ale (GBS)
  • Tim Hayes – California Common (GBS)
  • Jerid Saffell – Belgian Pale Ale, 4.8% ABV, 30 IBUs, Kent Golding & Saaz hops (GBS)
  • Scott Walters – “Fest Bier” Octoberfest Lager (GBS)
  • Scott Walters – “Fest Bier” Octoberfest Lager (GBS)

Update:  The East Side Brewers and the A-B Homebrew Club will also be serving up some of their beers as well:

East Side Brewers

Greg Bridwell(Imperial Pilsner)

  • Greg Campbell( Kolsch )
  • Jeff Harbaugh(California Common)
  • Toni Yager(TBD)
  • Joe Mansker(TBD)
  • Ben Cowan(Belgian Double)
  • Andrew Sanders(Brown Sugga)
  • Gary Burke(TBD)

A-B Homebrewers Club

  • Greg Campbell (dual member – East Side Brewers & A-B) (Indian Spiced Ale)
  • Steve Schick (Amber Ale)
  • Steve Schick (Amber Ale)
  • Tom Seiff (Saison)
  • Mark Vance (APA)
  • Mark Vance (Dunkelweizen)

Many of you who have talked to me in person over the past year have probably heard me talk a bit about my new homebrewing stand.  Well, I’m happy to say it’s pretty much completed.  (Let’s be honest, is there ever going to be a time when you stop tweaking things on projects you’re working on?)

So here’s the rundown of the system:

  • Single Tier Brutus 10 Frame Design
  • Direct Fire HLT (Hot Liquor Tank) and Boil Kettle
  • 130k BTU Propane Burners
  • This is a HERMS (Heat Exchanged Recirculating Mash System)
  • PID controls the temperature of the mash as it recirculates.
  • 16 Gallon Boil Kettle
  • Polysulfone quick disconnects

The external exchange is probably one of the biggest differences from most HERMS systems.  I got the suggestion from my friend Pat Reddy who showed me Dennis Collins’ external heat exchanger (his site is currently down, here’s the Google cache.)

Why an external exchanger?  Because it’s more efficient.  By using your HLT as the exchanger, you’re forced to heat and monitor 10-12 gallons of water at a certain temperature.  This external exchange only uses 1.5 gallons of water, which makes heating and cooling the water much quicker.

I also only have a single pump on this system.  Why?  Because I’m broke.  Plus, I can pour my runnings into a bucket and pick the bucket up and just pour it into the boil kettle.

Also, I want to thank Mike Leahy for his big help on this project.  Mike did all of the welding and construction on the frame and kettles.  There is no way I could have done that on my own, so I really appreciate everything he did.  If you have any other questions, feel free to ask.

Update: Willie Nordmann had a few questions, thought I’d post the answers here as well:

Why Polysulfone QD not brass? Worried about lead?
Wanted something I could handle with hot liquids. They’re a little more expensive, but it’s nice to know I can grab something without being burnt.

Hows the burners? Can they be adjusted to a low temp?
They put out a lot of heat. I mean, a lot. Yeah, I can get them to a low temp without a problem.

Is the an electric starter on the burner?
It was. It melted away. Again, a lot of heat.

So the PID controls the Electric heating element on the HERMS?
Correct.

The pump is controlled by plugging it in and moving around the QD?
Correct.

Is the heat exchanger also the chiller?
No, I have a separate immersion chiller for that.

When are you brewing next?
When it gets slightly warmer. I’m hoping some time in March. Still have a couple of tweaks to make to the system.

beer-312_1280×960.jpgAh, it’s that time of the year again. Time to break out your mash paddle, fire up the burners and teach someone how to homebrew! According to the American Homebrewers Association, “Teach a Friend to Homebrew Day is an international event to introduce people to the homebrewing hobby and establish relationships with local homebrew supply shops.”

Each year on the first Saturday in November homebrewers get together and gather up some friends and teach them how to brew beer. It could be possible that your friends may not ever brew a beer again, but I think it’s very important that if you love beer, you understand how beer is made.

But what if you don’t know a friend that homebrews? Well, you always have a friend in Drew Huerter, Jerid Saffell and Mattingly Brewing, as they’re hosting a homebrewing demonstration on November 7th starting at 8AM:

Anyone who would like to come down and brew or learn how to brew, Mattingly will be hosting again this year. This upcoming Saturday 11/7. I will be doing an all grain demo. If you plan to brew, please try to be there and set up between 8-10 am. I will have plenty of hot filtered water and cold chilling water around. Depending on our brew cycle I may have some yeast available as well. I can also mill your grain if you need such service.